Detroit Bookfest Cornhole Fundraiser

Detroit Bookfest Cornhole Fundraiser

Detroit Bookfest Cornhole Tournament 2024 at Fox Hills, Plymouth, Michigan

 

Big thank you to Bill Durham (Fox Hills GM) and Kari Kahanec (Fox Hills Event Manager) for making this happen

 

Welcome to the inaugural Detroit Bookfest Cornhole Fundraiser.

This fun Cornhole Tournament is all ages and open to anyone.

 

This event is being organized by Friends of Detroit Bookfest and Bearded Boards Cornhole.

This is a charity event. 100% of the proceeds go to Detroit Bookfest, which is a 501c3 non-profit organization.

 

Register your team here:

https://detroitbookfest.com/cornhole-registration-form/

 

Darren McCarty will be appearing at the Detroit Bookfest Cornhole Tournament!

Darren McCarty will be appearing at the Detroit Bookfest Cornhole Tournament! (photo by Darren McCarty)

 

We are deeply grateful to Fox Hills Golf & Banquet Center (Plymouth, Michigan) for hosting us.

Please read all of the information below then register your team. Thank you!

 

Register your team here:

https://detroitbookfest.com/cornhole-registration-form/

 

Fox Hills (Plymouth, Michigan)

 

The inaugural Detroit Bookfest Cornhole Tournament Fundraiser

Sunday, June 09, 2024

 

Noon start time

 

Fox Hills Plymouth map

 

 

 

 

Location

Fox Hills Golf & Banquet Center

8768 N. Territorial Road

Plymouth, MI 48170

 

Cost

$50.00 for two-person team. You must register online.

FREE for spectators

Register your team here:

https://detroitbookfest.com/cornhole-registration-form/

 

Afterwards

Many people will walk over and find great food and drinks for sale inside the Strategic Clubhouse or the Classic Grill inside the Fox Classic Clubhouse.

 

Ages

This is an all-ages event, open to anyone.

 

Appearances

Former Detroit Red Wings champion, Darren McCarty will be coming to the cornhole tournament! Darren will be doing meet n’ greet, signing autographs, taking photos, etc. Bring cash. Bring your items to be signed or purchase them from Darren.

Darren McCarty at Detroit Bookfest Cornhole Tournament (photo by Darren McCarty)

 

 

Bags

You can BYOB (bring your own bags) if you want to. If not, house bags will be provided to you.

 

Bar

Alcohol will be for sale for those 21+ up. You can purchase inside the Summerhouse or from one of the mobile carts or at one of the three clubhouses.

 

Beer

We are excited to announce that Bell’s Brewery and New Belgium Brewing Co. will be ON-SITE doing samplings, selling beer, and giving away swag/merch!

 

Bell’s Brewery & New Belgium Brewery at Detroit Bookfest Cornhole Tournament

 

Cornhole

Cornhole boards are placed 27 feet apart from front edge to front edge. You stand opposite your partner. Each team throws four bags per turn. You alternate throws with your opponent. A bag on the board is one point. A bag through the hole is three points.

In cancellation scoring, the points of one player cancel out the points of their opponent. For example: if you throw a bag through the hole, that’s 3 points and if your opponent gets two bags on the board, that’s two points. You would do 3-2, so you get one point on the scoreboard. Whichever team scores 21 points first is the winner of the game and will advance to the next round.

 

Detroit Bookfest

The Detroit Festival of Books (aka: Detroit Bookfest) is the largest book festival in the state of Michigan. Entry to the event is free. The event is organized by a 501c3 non-profit organization comprised entirely of unpaid volunteers who donate their time to making the event happen. It occurs annual on the 3rd Sunday in July at Detroit’s historic Eastern Market.

 

Food

Big Red’s BBQ Pit (based in Westland) are bringing their amazing BBQ foodtruck to the cornhole tournament! Click on the link for their menu. The food from this truck has gone viral online. They have some amazing BBQ food.

 

 

Format

The format is a round robin to match skill levels. Once levels are matched, it’s a Double Elimination (meaning if you lose two games, you’re out).

 

Fox Hills

Fox Hills is a 500-acre golf course with 63 holes of golf. They also have a driving range. Fox Hills is also very popular for special events like weddings. Fox Hills Country Club was established way back in 1927. Then in 1974 it became a public golf course. Thanks to the generosity of Fox Hills, we are able to host this fundraiser at Fox Hills.

Fox Hills has 3 golf courses: Golden (great and beautiful course), Strategic (short game, no driver needed), and Classic (versatile and great for any skill level). They also have two driving ranges and the Strategic range even has Footgolf.

Fox Hills is also a great location for events such as weddings, showers, high school banquets, corporate picnics, corporate team building, and more.

The Learning Center at Fox Hills features eight brand new Trackman simulators, which create an amazing experience for the user.

https://www.foxhills.com/

 

 

 

Location

The cornhole tournament will take place at the Summerhouse, both inside and on the Summerhouse lawn.

The Summerhouse is a 10,000 square foot pavilion with a bar and restrooms inside. The Summerhouse walls are made of retractable windscreens.

 

Fox Hills Summerhouse (Plymouth, Michigan)

 

Money

Teams must register online. Stripe is used to process your funds.

However, once you are at the event, cash is preferred for the 50/50 raffle, bars, foodtruck, etc. Credit cards and debit cards will also be accepted for bars and foodtruck.

 

Nature

Fox Hills is a certified Audubon Sanctuary. Bald eagles live on Fox Classic (the hills). There are also numerous deer, turkeys, sandhill cranes, and more.

A partial listing of wildlife sightings at Fox Hills includes a variety of birds such as herons, orioles, red tailed hawks, pheasants, woodpeckers and cedar wax wings. In addition, other animals such as fox, mink, muskrats, rabbits, frogs and turtles are commonly seen. Over 100 species of wildlife/birds have been observed on the property.

 

Bald Eagles at Fox Hills Plymouth

 

Organizers

Who is organizing this fundraiser? This charity fundraiser is being organized by Friends of Detroit Bookfest and Bearded Boards Cornhole. Thanks to the generosity of Fox Hills, we are able to host this fundraiser at Fox Hills. 100% of the proceeds go directly to Detroit Bookfest.

Bearded Boards Cornhole is co-organizing the Detroit Bookfest Cornhole Tournament

 

 

Parking

Fox Hills regularly handles massive events. There is plenty of free parking.

 

Prizes

1st place prize, 2nd place prize, 3rd place cash prizes. Amounts depend on how many teams register.

 

Proceeds

100% of the proceeds go to Detroit Bookfest, which is a 501c3 non-profit organization.

 

Raffle

There will be a 50/50 Raffle. Bring cash to buy your raffle tickets!

 

Refunds

Refunds will only be issued if this event does not take place.

 

Registration

You can register your two-person team here. The cost is $50.00 per team.

https://detroitbookfest.com/cornhole-registration-form/

 

Scoreholio

This game will be tracked using the Scoreholio phone app to manage the stats. You can create a profile on here and follow our game, if you want to.

Scoreholio QR code for Detroit Bookfest Cornhole Tournament

 

Spectators

Spectators are free. Come hang out, have some food, have some drinks, and watch the cornhole spectacle unfold!

 

Time

The start time is Noon. The exact end time is unknown since we do not know how many competitors there are yet and how long each game will be.

 

Weather

This event is rain or shine. It will be open air if the weather is nice. If raining, the event will take under the roof of the Summerhouse Pavilion.

 

Questions

If you have any further questions, please fill out this contact form:

https://detroitbookfest.com/contact-us/

 

Detroit Bookfest Cornhole Fundraiser

Fox Hills Summerhouse Plymouth interior

Fox Hills Summerhouse Plymouth interior

 

Thanks for the Shout-Out BooksaleFinder.com!

Thanks for the Shout-Out BooksaleFinder.com!

Detroit Festival of Books on Booksalefinder.com

 

Special thank you to Helen & Tom Oram and the team in Massachusetts at BookSaleFinder.com for listing our event!

Helen & Tom created BookSaleFinder.com in 1994.

Their website is a phenomenal resource for locating over 10,000+ book sales in the USA.

 

Detroit Bookfest @ BookSaleFinder.com

https://www.booksalefinder.com/MI.html#X15138

 

 

Detroit Bookfest @ BookSaleFinder.com

https://www.booksalefinder.com/MI.html#X15138

 

Exclusive Interview: Touring the Paulson Aviation Library @ Canton’s Mettetal Airport

Exclusive Interview: Touring the Paulson Aviation Library @ Canton’s Mettetal Airport

Aerial photo of Mettetal Airport Canton (photo courtesy of Mettetal)

 

Mettetal Airport is a non-towered airport (ie: no control tower) that was founded in 1939 on 63 acres in Canton, Michigan. One of the hangars contains a rare resource in the form of Paulson Aviation Library.

John Maxfield, VP of EAA Chapter 113, graciously answered questions and provided a fascinating tour.

“We have about 3,500 volumes. The library was started in 2002 and is hyper-focused on all things aviation. Our main librarian is Barb Cook but she’s on vacation right now. And yes, this is a functional library, Dewey catalogued and everything.”

 

Paulson Aviation Library @ Canton’s Mettetal Airport (photo by Ryan M. Place)

 

“The library features mostly books. Non-fiction, biographical, military, reference & technical manuals. We also have vintage journals, flight manuals, various ephemera, photos, DVDs and VHS tapes.”

“Some classic standard books we have are Stick and Rudder (1944), We (1927) Lindbergh, and Carrying the Fire (1974). I’m currently looking for a decent copy of Sled Driver (1991) by Brian Schul.”

“The founder of our library, Robert Paulson, was a Colonel in the Civil Air Patrol. He was a CAP Chaplain, lived in Dearborn, and was parish priest at Church of the Holy Cross in Novi. He was also a book enthusiast and initially started this library by donating his own personal collection. He didn’t own an airplane, so this was his main project. And it’s grown over the years mostly via donations.”

“Mettetal Airport was started by Bob Mettetal. He was a bomber pilot in WWII. His brother Marv (Marvin) was also a pilot. The Mettetal family owned the land since 1920 when it was purchased by Bob’s dad Raphael (Ray) Mettetal. They had a greenhouse and decided to build an airport. Currently, Mettetal is mostly a recreation airport for enthusiasts, and it’s also used by corporations and air ambulances. It’s owned by MDOT Office of Aeronautics.”

 

Robert Mettetal @ Mettetal Airport Canton (photo courtesy of Google Archives)

 

The State of Michigan has made a couple of incredible historic contributions to the field of aviation. In the 1920’s-30’s, Ford Motor Company invented commercial airline travel with the Ford-Trimotor Airplane. What is now Ford Proving Ground (Oakwood Blvd, Dearborn) used to be the Ford Airport, which had one of the world’s first paved runways. The Dearborn Inn across the street was one of the first air travel hotels. And the other contribution was of course the Willow Run Bomber Plant in Ypsilanti during World War Two.”

Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) is the world’s largest recreation sport aviation association. EAA Chapter 113 was founded here at Mettetal in 1961. Our nickname is the Backyard Eagles. Anyone from the general public can join. Legally, the chapter cannot own an airworthy airplane but flying clubs can form within. Our chapter has 4 flying clubs with 7 airplanes, mostly single-engine Cessnas.”

“We host interesting speakers monthly every 3rd Thursday. We’ve had authors, parachute riggers, aviation medics, astronauts, military personnel, etc. And our Young Eagles program offers free airplane rides for those aged 8-17. We do this four times per year.”

 

Paulson Aviation Library @ Canton’s Mettetal Airport (photo by Ryan M. Place)

 

Donate your aviation books (they may possibly purchase exceptionally rare items)

[email protected]

Paulson Aviation Library is available by appointment and also during regular gatherings (3rd Thurs of the month, 7:30pm) and events (see calendar on their website).

 

Paulson Aviation Library @ Mettetal Airport

8550 N. Lilley Road

Canton, MI 48187

 

EAA Chapter 113 @ Mettetal Airport

https://chapters.eaa.org/eaa113

 

Young Eagles

https://www.yeday.org/

 

EAA Chapter 113 @ Mettetal Airport Canton (photo courtesy of EAA)

 

Mettetal Airport records @ Plymouth Historical Museum

https://plymouthhistory.org/cm/dpl/downloads/content/57/Mettetal_Airport_RG_5_.pdf

 

Genealogy info for Mettetal Family

https://www.oocities.org/heartland/hills/8073/tiny1.html

 

Directory of Michigan Airports

https://www.michigan.gov/mdot/travel/mobility/aeronautics/airports

 

Col. Robert W. Paulson @ Mettetal Airport

 

Robert Paulson comments on NW Crash

https://www.upi.com/Archives/1987/08/17/Investigators-today-tentatively-ruled-out-sabotage-aboard-a-Northwest/1893556171200/

 

Robert Paulson obituary

https://www.legacy.com/us/obituaries/detroitnews/name/robert-paulson-obituary?id=41424130

 

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/83855512/robert-waldron-paulson

 

Some other interesting aviation libraries to check out:

 

  • MI-Kzoo-WMU’s Waldo Library-flight simulator lab
  • OH-Dayton-Museum of the USAF
  • WashDC-Smithsonian Ntl Air and Space Museum library (40,000 volumes)
  • WA-Seattle-Museum of Flight’s Bracklin Library (36,000 volumes)
  • TX-UT Dallas-McDermott Lib-Aviation Archives

 

Paulson Aviation Library @ Canton’s Mettetal Airport (photo by Ryan M. Place)

Paulson Aviation Library @ Canton’s Mettetal Airport (photo by Ryan M. Place)

Paulson Aviation Library @ Canton’s Mettetal Airport (photo by Ryan M. Place)

Sonex 2012 airplane built by John Maxfield. 130 mph cruising speed (photo courtesy of John Maxfield)

Col. Robert W. Paulson

Paulson Aviation Library

Flight simulator @ Paulson Aviation Library @ Canton’s Mettetal Airport

Mettetal Airport (Canton, Michigan)

Barb Cook, librarian at Paulson Aviation Library @ Canton’s Mettetal Airport

John Maxfield, VP of EAA Chapter 113 @ Canton’s Mettetal Airport (photo by John Maxfield)

Mettetal Airport Canton archives (courtesy of Google Archives)

Mettetal Airport Canton archives (courtesy of Google Archives)

John Maxfield @ Mettetal Airport Canton archives (courtesy of Google Archives)

Proposed airplane mechanics school @ Mettetal Airport Canton archives (courtesy of Google Archives)

Robert Mettetal @ Mettetal Airport Canton archives (courtesy of Google Archives)

Robert Mettetal @ Mettetal Airport Canton archives (courtesy of Google Archives)

Mettetal Airport Canton archives (courtesy of Google Archives)

Michigan State Police at Mettetal Airport Canton (photo courtesy of MSP)

Top 10 Tips for Detroit Bookfest Attendees

Top 10 Tips for Detroit Bookfest Attendees

Top 10 Tips for Detroit Bookfest Attendees!

 

The annual Detroit Festival of Books (aka: Detroit Bookfest) will be held on Sunday, July 16, 2023 from 10am-4pm at Eastern Market’s Shed 5.

FREE ENTRY for attendees!

Detroit Bookfest is a glorious day of BOOKS, records, comics, creative arts, food, drinks, funk music and exploring Detroit’s incredible Eastern Market District.

The district is anchored by the actual Eastern Market itself, which is a series of large consumer sheds.

Be sure to check out our Official Detroit Bookfest Afterparty from 10am-8pm, which is located a few blocks Southeast at Eastern Market Brewing Company

https://detroitbookfest.com/bookfest-afterparty-embc/

 

We encourage everyone to check out the Official Detroit Bookfest Festival Guide

https://detroitbookfest.com/detroit-bookfest-festival-guide/

Top 10 Tips for Detroit Bookfest Attendees!

 

Top 10 Tips for Detroit Bookfest Attendees

 

1.) Every vendor is on their own in terms of cash flow and providing change. There is no centralized market bank. Please help the vendors out by bringing small bills, if you can. $1’s, $5’s, $10’s will be needed. Yes, there are two nearby ATM’s (ie: Shed 5 northern exterior wall and also the Chase Bank across the street). Several vendors should have the ability to accept credit card payments on their smartphones, however, we are not sure that all of them will have this ability.

 

2.) There will be vendors inside Shed 5. And there will be the Community Activities area outside Shed 5 along Russell Street. Please check out both! There will also be music, food trucks, ping-pong, and more!

 

3.) Wear a pair of good, comfortable walking shoes. We encourage you to make a day of it and check out the fabulous Eastern Market District, which is packed with a ton of great eateries, bars and stores of all sorts. If you haven’t already, please read our Official Detroit Bookfest Festival Guide.

https://detroitbookfest.com/detroit-bookfest-festival-guide/

 

4.) This event is all-weather, so dress accordingly. Dress comfortably and casually. Watch the weather forecast and if you think you may need an umbrella, please bring one.

 

5.) Make sure you check out our food vendors on Alfred Street on the south side of Shed 5.

Bookfest Food Vendors

https://detroitbookfest.com/bookfest-food-trucks/ 

 

Top 10 Tips for Detroit Bookfest Attendees!

 

6.) Parking is plentiful, however, it is scattered around the Eastern Market district. Make sure you plan accordingly. You can drop people off, park, then get the car and pick them up, if you need to. Eastern Market oftentimes handles even larger events which get 150,000+ people at them, so there are places to park, just be prepared to walk a little bit.

 

7.) Public restrooms are located inside Shed 5 and spread throughout Eastern Market. If there are long lines at one, walk over to another bathroom.

 

8.) This event is all-ages. The love of books can start at any age, so parents, bring your family and always remember to keep an eye on your children. There will be several children’s activities going on in the Community Activities area outside Shed 5, including a book donation drive. If you have any kids books to donate, please bring them!

 

9.) Warning: grooveilicious FUNK MUSIC might make you feel the unexpected urge to boogie. If you feel like dancing, then dance!

 

10.) We are tremendously excited about this event and feel it is an important and positive happening for Detroit and Michigan and the world of books and many other things. Please help us spread the word on your favorite social media websites by posting photos and telling people about your experience.

 

THANK YOU! We love you all and hope everyone has a great time!

 

And pull out your calendars…

The 7th Annual Detroit Festival of Books will be on Sunday, July 21st, 2024.

 

Top 10 Tips for Detroit Bookfest Attendees!

Exclusive Interview: Detroit artist BILL MORRISON on his life & career with The Simpsons, Futurama, Mad Magazine, his new Beatles book, and more!

Exclusive Interview: Detroit artist BILL MORRISON on his life & career with The Simpsons, Futurama, Mad Magazine, his new Beatles book, and more!

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Bill Morrison is a tremendously talented artist and writer.

A child prodigy in art and drawing, he could draw better at age three than I can at age thirty-six. His competency across a broad range of specialties and his career trajectory are jaw-droppingly impressive as he continues upping the ante by challenging himself with new and different projects.

He lives in a lovely stately historic home in St. Clair Shores, Michigan, which backs up to the vast and beautiful Lake St. Clair.

Bill lives with his wife Kayre (pronounced ‘Care’), two dogs Gidget and Ripley, two cats Ziggy and Freddie, and a world-class collection of comics, collectibles, and artwork. His home studio is a delightful wonderland of creativity, pop culture inspirations, and gobs upon gobs of wickedly good Bill Morrison original art.

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

I’m here chatting with Bill. He was both brave enough to let me into his home and kind enough to answer my 10,000 rambling questions.

As a lifelong fan of The Simpsons and Bill’s work, I’ve owned several of his comics, watched several of his shows, and for years had the amazing full cast of The Simpsons poster on my wall that Mr. Morrison did.

Meeting him was an honor and I can tell you that he is a thoroughly cool dude.

The Simpsons kitchen sink poster art by Bill Morrison

He is also admirably, perpetually busy, as evidenced by his new book, The Beatles Nerd Search: All You Nerd is Love: A Yellow Submarine Puzzle Book, which came out November 02, 2021.

Published by Hero Collector, it’s a treasure trove of trivia masked as intentional continuity errors that are artfully designed to test your mental abilities of recognition and recall.

And now, ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Bill Morrison!

 

Bill on The Beatles

Nerd Search: All You Nerd is Love: A Yellow Submarine Puzzle Book by Bill Morrison

I’m a huge Beatles fan. My involvement with creating The Beatles books goes back to 1998 when Dark Horse Comics asked me to do a graphic novel for the 30th anniversary of Yellow Submarine. The deal unfortunately fell through midway. However, in 2018, I ended up doing a 112-page graphic novel adaptation of The Beatles Yellow Submarine for Titan Comics.”

Titan Comics is based in London. They published our Simpsons stuff for Bongo in the UK. Initially, the licensing agent for The Beatles merchandise was interested in having me link up with Titan for the graphic novel. Then they came to me with a second project because they needed a pre-approved artist and put me in touch with Hero Collector, which is owned by Eaglemoss.”

“Hero said they have a series of books called Nerd Search where each scene has purposely incorrect information & items that the reader has to find, clues to solve, and at the end you get all the answers and rate yourself. I had a great time doing the book and I’m looking forward to seeing what the fan reaction is.”

“I’ve been a lifelong Beatles fan. Favorite song is Hey Bulldog. Favorite album is Rubber Soul. And I listen to The Beatles Channel on SiriusXM all the time.”

“I saw ‘A Hard Days Night’ (1964) at the drive-in when I was five, sitting in the back of the station wagon. Back then everyone was playing Beatles records.”

“The first album I had was Alvin and the Chipmunks Sing the Beatles Hits, then I got into the Saturday morning cartoon (1965-67), and saw Yellow Submarine (68) the first time it aired on TV in 1970.”

Beatles Yellow Submarine graphic novel by Bill Morrison

“I remember in high school there was a Broadway show called Beatlemania (1977-79) which was really popular and created a resurgence of interest in The Beatles. By that time, I was doing artwork and t-shirts.”

“At high school, my friend Steve Colwell and I started a small t-shirt business selling shirts of rock stars. We passed an order sheet around to everyone at school and they would place orders for our shirts.”

“My sister actually got to see The Beatles live in 1966 at Olympia Stadium in Detroit. My dad drove them and sat in the parking lot. The Beatles only played for a half hour, but they had several other opening bands, which was common at the time. Dad was smoking a cigarette outside the car when the big garage door on the side of the stadium rolled up. A big black limo pulls out as he hears the kids leaving. Suddenly the crowd spots the limo, and this horde of Beatles-crazed fans starts running towards him. My dad is between The Beatles and the kids. He says he had to jump onto a lamp post to avoid being trampled!

 

The Early Years (or who is Bill Morrison and why am I in his house?)

Bill Morrison as Batman (photo courtesy of Bill Morrison)

“I’m an artist, writer, collector. I like working at my home studio where I use mostly traditional tools of the trade, some digital. I sketch with a blue pencil, use graphite and ink for comics, acrylic for painting, brush painting or airbrush, depending on the texture I’m trying to achieve. As for writing, I frequently jot down random notes in a book, otherwise I type in Microsoft Word.”

My passion, thankfully, is my career and I don’t really have any other hobbies or interests beyond it. I love collecting toys, comics, art, but that all pretty much relates to my job. My wife and I like Art Deco, NY World’s Fair memorabilia, books (especially books on comics, comic collecting, illustrating, graphic novels).”

“My most marketable ability as a commercial artist is I can pick up other artist’s styles very quickly, which is very helpful in animation. I need a few practice sketches to find the rhythm, then I have it.”

Bill Morrison with Casper doll (photo courtesy of Bill Morrison)

“I was born January 15, 1959, and grew up in Lincoln Park, Michigan, about ten minutes south of Detroit. My dad is from the Hocking Hills, Ohio area and my mom is from Wyandotte, Michigan. Her father was Judge Arthur Decker, who as a young man, was a prize fighter nicknamed Kid Decker. My parents have always been very supportive of my artistic ambitions.”

“I have four living siblings: Alice, Donna, Sue, and Janice. My brother Don just passed away recently. Two of my sisters live here in Michigan, and two live elsewhere. My wife Kayre is also from Lincoln Park. Yes, we started dating in high school, and we recently moved back to Michigan to be closer to our families. This fulfills the mission of my youngest sister Alice, who lives in Novi, and has been trying to re-gather all of us for years.”

“Growing up, my older sister Sue was artistic, and she taught me how to draw at age three. She sat me down at the kitchen table and taught me how to draw a stickman. She drew a figure and told me to copy it. Then she left, came back in ten minutes, and says I had “vastly improved” on the drawing. She got real excited, thought I was a natural talent. She was always keyed into what I was into. Early on I would emulate her character drawings of Snoopy, the Wolfman, etc, whatever my mania was at the time”

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

“In 1977, I graduated Lincoln Park High School and immediately enrolled in Detroit’s College for Creative Studies. I started off wanting to be a comic book artist but learned I’d have to go to NYC to establish myself. I love New York now, but back then the idea of living there sort of terrified me. I had a teacher Gary Ciccarelli for airbrush class. He was really into the whole West Coast airbrush scene, which was highly glamorized, stylized, lot of palm trees and neon. And he turned us onto stuff I hadn’t been exposed to.”

“I graduated CCS in 1981 and got a job at Artech, Inc. in Livonia doing technical drawings for the automotive industry. I would be in a big room with 15 artists. The guys in the other room would look at a blueprint and sketch it out in 3D, then they would send it to us and we would refine and perfect it. We did mostly engine stuff, mechanics manuals & parts catalogs, cut-away paintings of diesel fuel pumps, etc.”

“In 1982, I married Karen “Kayre” DeLosier, the love of my life, and we lived in Plymouth, Michigan for a bit near Plymouth Road and Haggerty, before moving to the West Coast. Moved to Beverly Hills briefly, then Sepulveda (which became North Hills), then Simi Valley.”

 

L.A. in the ‘80s: a town awash in neon and perms and mohawks, oh my!

Bill Morrison with Roger Rabbit (photo courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Bill was employed as a professional illustrator at B.D. Fox and Friends Advertising from 1982-86, which is where he first met legendary cartoonist, Matt Groening, who was just an unknown scribbler at the time. After that, Bill was at Willardson & Associates. During this time, he also worked on iconic movie posters like the famous Little Mermaid (1989), The Land Before Time (1988), Oliver and Company (1988), all sorts of Disney movies, of which he said his favorite poster is The Prince and The Pauper (1990).

My first job in Hollywood was doing movie posters at B.D. Fox and Matt (Groening) was a freelance writer there. B.D. Fox was a boutique ad agency for the entertainment industry. A co-worker, Mili Smythe was an art director there and she was friends with Matt, they’re both from Portland, and she introduced us. Mili told me about Matt’s comic strip, Life in Hell.”

“Occasionally she would ask us for input on things like childhood songs to give to Matt, who would then put the song references in the comic strip. At work, Matt would pitch tag lines for posters, but we didn’t really become good friends until The Simpsons.”

The Prince and the Pauper (1990) poster art by Bill Morrison

“I designed the posters for horror movies House (85), Blood Diner (87), and I was the in-house illustrator doing rough sketches and comps for films like The Return of the Living Dead (1985). Art directors would come to see me with ideas they needed me to draw up. For the Return of the Living Dead poster, I don’t know who did the final painting but I remember being surprised that Bill Stout didn’t do it. He was a well-known poster artist, and he designed the zombies for the film”

“In 1986, I was invited to work at an illustration studio owned by David Willardson, the California airbrush artist, called Willardson & Associates. We did all sorts of advertising for all different products, mostly photo realistic work but glorified, Nestles Quick, Maxell Tape, etc, and one of the jobs was for Disney. It was a re-release of Cinderella, they wanted a one-sheet poster. I did a teaser they liked, then another one, and another one, then anytime Disney released an animated film into theaters. I did Little Mermaid, Oliver and Co, Rescuers Down Under, Roller Coaster Rabbit, Prince and the Pauper (a Mickey Mouse featurette), Peter Pan, Jungle Book, Bambi, Lady and Tramp, Fox and Hound, etc.”

“I did The Land Before Time movie poster for Amblin Entertainment. I only did the characters, not the background. This was in the pre-photoshop days and I’m at the studio and I get this big painting delivered. They said we need you to re-draw the dinosaur characters and paste them over the existing ones. I did it on one-ply Strathmore paper, which was tricky to paint on because it’s so thin. Then cut out the outline perfectly with an x-acto knife then painted the edges with a brush. It’s very hard to match outline colors perfectly. Then I took spray mount and permanently sprayed them onto this guy’s painting, which seemed kind of unethical but I had to do it.”

 

The Simpsons & Matt Groening

First signing with Matt: from L to R are Matt Groening, Steve Vance, Bill Morrison (photo courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Bill joined The Simpsons crew in 1990 and played a seminal role in the global expansion of the franchise. He was doing illustrations for 20th Century Fox and creating all sorts of art for merchandise, sketches, t-shirts, posters, etc, while simultaneously art-directing other merchandise artists at Klasky Csupo Animation Studio.

In 1987, The Simpsons made their global debut on the Tracey Ullman Show. It was one of the animated bumpers they did. Then it morphed into the December 1989 Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire holiday special episode, then the show officially premiered February 1990. It was an immediate blockbuster hit.”

Simpsons Yellow Album art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

“I knew Matt (Groening) from our time working together at the ad agency a few years prior. He brought me into The Simpsons creative family, and I started doing character drawings for merchandise. I created the merch style guide, which is for companies who license the brand. If a licensee takes out a license, they get a style guide of images they can use. Some licensees pay extra for custom artwork. I also did almost all of the video game packaging in the early days, along with calendars, books, and more.”

“I didn’t have anything to do with the characters beyond what they looked like until we did the comic books. Sometimes the stories in Simpsons Comics necessitated creating new characters. For Radioactive Man we got to create a broader cast of characters because they didn’t exist on the show. Radioactive Man’s origins are similar to the Hulk. Fallout Boy’s origins are similar to Spider Man. It’s mostly parody and satire. At one time there was talk of doing a Radioactive Man cartoon show but the idea was shelved when Futurama came out. I would love to see the idea get revived and think it could be a big hit.”

Simpsons Comics & Stories # 1 art by Bill Morrison

“In April 1991, Simpsons Illustrated launched and the series ran for ten issues. It had a comic section, and at the end of the second year, Groening and Editor Steve Vance wanted a gimmicky annual issue, so we decided let’s do a comic book. We named it Simpsons Comics and Stories and it came out in February 1993.”

“It was such a big hit that it gave Matt the confidence to start Bongo Comics, so we did. Starting a comic was a dream come true. We started it in November 1993. I served as Art Director, Steve Vance was the editor and his wife Cindy was colorist and letterer. After the first year the Vances left, and I became the Creative Director (Editor and Art Director.) I was directly involved in some way with every issue (writing, penciling, inking, supervising, art direction, etc). My favorite character to draw is probably Radioactive Man.”

Matt and I are still good friends to this day.

The Simpsons episode: A Serious Flanders (November 2021) poster art by Bill Morrison

“In terms of The Simpsons tv show, my favorite episodes are Radioactive Man, Black Widower (great art direction), and many of the episodes from the Conan O’Brien era (1991-93). Also, I love the recent two-part episode “A Serious Flanders” for which I created an advertising poster.”

Bill also did the cover artwork for The Simpsons DVD’s.

And Bill won several Eisner Awards for Simpsons Comics (2000), The Amazing Colossal Homer (1994), and Radioactive Man.

 

Roswell Little Green Man, Futurama, and more!

Roswell Little Green Man art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

“In 1996, I produced my own comic series for Bongo called Roswell, Little Green Man. Although Roswell loosely takes place in the late 1940’s, it was my love of 50’s sci-fi films that inspired it. The first story deals with giant ants, harkening back to Them! (1954 sci-fi movie). The series was nominated in four different categories for the highly coveted Eisner Award. We ended it because we started a little show called Futurama and I didn’t have time to work on the show, along with my Bongo duties, and also my own comic.”

I was the Art Director on Futurama from 1998-2003. I assisted in the creation of the cast of characters with Matt Groening. Matt was the creator of the show and Futurama was done by The Curiosity Company, Matt’s own production company.”

“We did four seasons, 140 episodes. It was on Tuesday nights when it first premiered, and Matt didn’t like that. He told Fox execs to put it on Sunday nights 8:30 p.m. right after The Simpsons. They wouldn’t do it. Finally, they put it on Sunday’s but at 7:00 p.m., which was too early. Futurama is a workplace adult comedy, it’s about adults, romances, and it was inappropriate to put on then. Plus, at that time slot, if sports games ran longer than anticipated, which they frequently do, they had to cut portions of the episodes or not even air the episodes.”

Futurama art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

“I loved Futurama, especially Leela, and I helped design many of the weirder characters before Matt pitched the show. Matt would always do a final cut and tweak it. We’d be at his studio, he would give me a paragraph on a character, I would do drawings, then show him, it sparked him visually, then he would do a drawing, I would refine it, etc, it was a collaboration. I always felt my biggest contribution to the show was sometimes showing Matt what he didn’t want because it would help him decide which way to go with a character. It’s very difficult to create unique and original characters. Having some input from friends is valuable, the visceral reaction is valuable.”

“In 2000, I did a six-issue mini-series for Bongo called Heroes Anonymous. My editorial assistant at the time was Scott Gimple and I invited him to work on it with me. It’s about a support group for superheroes. We had it in development at the SyFy Channel for a while. Scott had moved on to Disney where he was working on a show called Fillmore, which was a safety patrol played as a 70’s cop show. He had an agent at this point who wanted him to go out and pitch ideas for shows that he owned. Since we co-created Heroes Anonymous he called me and we started pitching it to networks and the SyFy channel took an option. Scott and I worked together on the story for the pilot and Scott wrote the script. I was going to be on board as a producer. The network would give us notes on the script, and at first they were good notes. But eventually the notes got silly and were making the script worse. Finally, it got to the point that their suggested improvement notes were too embarrassing to seriously consider. We chose not to renew the option when it came up. Scott did okay though, he’s now the showrunner on The Walking Dead.”

“After that, I was lucky enough to be able to do my first book, which was a career retrospective on Dan DeCarlo, one of my favorite comic book artists. Dan is best known for drawing Archie comics and creating Josie and the Pussycats and co-creating Sabrina the Teen-age Witch. The book is called Innocence and Seduction: The Art of Dan DeCarlo. I knew Dan personally. We were friends until he passed away in 2001. I was also a fan and there were no good books on Dan’s art. I wanted to create something that didn’t exist yet.”

The Art of Dan DeCarlo book by Bill Morrison

“A few years later, I collaborated with Jane Wiedlin, co-founder of The Go-Go’s. In 2010, we did a comic book called Lady Robotika which was published by Image. The concept is based on Jane as a cyborg space hero.”

“In 2015, I wrote and illustrated Dead Vengeance for Dark Horse Comics. It’s a tribute to the gritty 1940’s pulp era and takes place in Detroit.”

Dead Vengeance by Bill Morrison

“Near my end at Bongo, Matt was working on a new show (what later became the show Disenchantment) and I was talking to the businesspeople telling them I’m looking for something creatively challenging. They said Matt wants to do a new company, comic, show, etc, but he’s not quite there yet. But we do want to develop a comic reader app for mobile phones and iPads, so I did that.”

“I designed comic reader apps. Here I am, devoted to printed comics, and I had to develop and promote comics on electronic devices. Had to learn the guided view mechanics of reading a comic online, panel to panel scrolling, etc. To do this I had to download digital comics and study them. I started taking them on trips with me and realized that you can still have your physical collection at home but also embrace digital comics as a convenience. I started promoting the app, called The Simpsons Store, then the Futuramaland comic reader.”

 

The National Cartoonists Society

Bill Morrison (National Cartoonists Society)

Founded in 1946, the prestigious National Cartoonists Society is the world’s main professional organization for people working in cartoons and comics. To be admitted membership, published cartoonists must send in samples of their work. Once vetted, they can become Artist members. Bill joined NCS in the mid-90’s and served as President from 2015-2019.

“I was a casual member for years. Then served on the board for Jeff Keane (Family Circus), then continued as VP on the board of Tom Richmond (Mad Magazine cartoonist). Then I became president.”

National Cartoonists Society 27 Club

“It was a lot of work but very rewarding. It’s mind boggling to think I’m part of that lineage, a fraternity of my heroes. It’s very difficult to get people to join clubs nowadays as regular dues-paying members. I’m glad that I was able to help come up with some good ideas to move NCS forward.”

Sergio Aragonés, Steve McGarry, and I were discussing effective strategies for reaching out to cartoonists and making it easy for them to join NCS. We came up with The 27 Club, where they don’t pay the $180 annual fee, and any cartoonist under 27 years old can join for only $27/yr. Jason Chatfield, who served as my VP and is now the president, continues taking it on. I love the NCS. We have the Reuben Awards every year for the Outstanding Cartoonist of the year. And last year we had our first annual online convention, which was great and well-received.”

 

MAD Magazine

MAD Magazine has been around since the Atomic Fifties, 1952 to be exact. This legacy institution had the foresight to hire Bill Morrison as Executive Editor in 2017.

“When DC Comics moved from New York City to Burbank, California, the MAD guys didn’t want to go. Finally, the publisher at DC worked out something with Warner Bros where the MAD Magazine offices could stay in NYC, but it was agreed that once they found someone to take over MAD, it would move to Burbank.”

Then they hired me, and I had to hire a full staff, except for one guy who did decide to move from NY. I had done some freelance jobs for MAD in the past and now here I was overseeing all creative aspects of the magazine. We had good people, especially the art director, Suzy Hutchinson. I’d look at everything, make notes, some minor changes, etc. I loved working there.”

Bill Morrison with Alfred E. Neuman (art by Tom Richmond)

“We were given a really tough assignment, which was to take a magazine read by mostly white males (ages 11-16 and 45-60), most of whom subscribed and they wanted us to expand the readership to women, other ethnicities, and other age-ranges, while not losing our current subscribers. We succeeded in getting subscription numbers up, had expansion ideas that were ambitious but doable, talked about the possibility of live comedy shows at the Hollywood American Legion Post 43, simulcasting, taking it on tour, new merchandise, etc.”

“We were getting great positive feedback. I’m connected with hardcore (and therefore critical) MAD fans who told us we had struck a great balance. But corporate decisions beyond my control caused MAD to go to a reprint format.”

 

Bill’s Influences & Collections

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

“I’m real big on Batman art and toys, non-superhero stuff like horror (especially Universal Monsters) and sci-fi, teen humor (any era but mostly 50’s 60’s). I typically go for eras and artists over genres. My favorite eras are 50’s-60’s.”

“Some favorite artists are Dick Sprang, Bob Oksner, Sergio Aragones, Dan DeCarlo. Growing up, some favorites were Neal Adams, Bernie Wrightson, Jim Steranko.”

It Rhymes with Lust (1950) cover art by Matt Baker

“Another favorite artist is Matt Baker, but his art is so expensive. He did the great cover for It Rhymes with Lust (1950) which many people consider to be the first-ever graphic novel.”

“Fine art, I like Salvador Dali, John Singer Sargent, M.C. Escher, Alphonse Mucha…though some might consider him more of an illustrator. Comedically, I’ve been influenced by Jerry Lewis, Woody Allen, Steve Martin, Mel Brooks, and more recently by Melissa McCarthy and Tina Fey.”

“To this day, I’m constantly discovering new influences. I also like the painter Norm Saunders, illustrator Wally Wood, Will Eisner, Robert Crumb, etc, too many to list!”

Mars Attacks art (card 32) by Norman Saunders (1962)

 

Upcoming Projects

Bill Morrison holding a giant eyeball bowling ball (photo courtesy of Bill Morrison)

“Right now, I’m working on a new one-shot comic for Ahoy Comics. I just did a cover for an Image comic called Stray Dogs.”

“I’ve been doing stuff for the fine art print market. And I’m doing some animation development projects and helping producers visualize their concepts.”

 

Final Thoughts

Bill at the drawing board, Bongo Comics (photo courtesy of Bill Morrison)

“At Comic Con (SDCC) one year, maybe ‘94-95, right after a speculator boom, when the industry took a turn downturn and was downsizing and consolidating, some publishers were shutting down, things at the time were looking down not up. The great Will Eisner walked by the Bongo Comics booth and I asked him his thoughts about the doom and gloom end-of-the-industry rumors. He said ‘I’ve seen this happen five or six times since the 1930’s. Comics is a language and a medium that people love. It might change shape, but graphic storytelling is an artform and is always going to exist’ and I thought that was tremendously uplifting and insightful and I try to always keep that in mind.”

My advice to aspiring creatives is to always be open to opportunities you didn’t necessarily anticipate. For example, I never thought I’d be a writer, art director, editor. But I said yes, I was open to it and ended up discovering that I love those roles. Talented young people tend to focus on one single thing only and might invariably miss out on other areas of rich potential. Sometimes you just gotta say yes and then figure it out. If you don’t like it, you can always stop doing it and do something else until you find the things you’re great at and love doing.”

 

Atomic Battery Studios (Bill’s official Facebook page)

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100063233047912

 

Comic Art Fans

https://www.comicartfans.com/gallerydetail.asp?gcat=9451

 

Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/atomicbattery/?hl=en

 

Twitter

https://twitter.com/billmorrisonman?lang=en

 

LinkedIn

https://www.linkedin.com/in/bill-morrison-679341b

 

More images from the Bill Morrison archives

Bill Morrison tiki mug (photo courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Jetson’s Robot Basher art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Alice Cooper Make Parties Sparkle art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Bartman # 1 art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Bill Morrison with Dave Willardson, Calvin Patton and Dave Stevens (photo courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Angry Donald Duck art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Dr. Phibes Rises Again VHS art by Bill Morrison

Little Mermaid movie poster art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Bill Morrison, Cindy Vance, Will Eisner, Steve Vance circa 1995 (photo courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Bongo Comics art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

movie House (1985) poster art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Aretha art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Disney Bambi movie poster art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Bongo Comics art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

CAPS (Comic Art Professionals Society) bon voyage to Bill Morrison

Hot Coffey in the D album cover art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Futurama art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Peter Pan-American Airways art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

The Jungle Book movie poster art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Rollercoaster Rabbit poster art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Bongo Comics art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Bongo Comics art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

Homer Simpson with Rocky & Bullwinkle art by Bill Morrison (image courtesy of Bill Morrison)

 

 

Photos from the Bookfest Interview

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Detroit artist Bill Morrison at his home studio (photo by: Ryan M. Place)