News Media about Detroit Festival of Books (aka: Detroit Bookfest)

News Media about Detroit Festival of Books (aka: Detroit Bookfest)

6th annual Detroit Festival of Books in July 2023 at Eastern Market’s Shed 5 in Detroit (photo by Debbie Maciolek)

 

This is a collection of various news media pieces about Detroit Festival of Books (aka: Detroit Bookfest):

 

DBusiness (2024)

https://www.dbusiness.com/daily-news/dbusiness-daily-update-detroit-festival-of-books-to-expand-in-2024-and-more/

Visit Detroit (2024)

https://visitdetroit.com/events/7th-annual-detroit-festival-of-books/#:~:text=7th%20annual%20Detroit%20Bookfest%20Sunday,%2Dday%20six%2Dhour%20event

 

CBS News Detroit (2023)

https://www.cbsnews.com/detroit/news/detroit-festival-of-books-returns-for-6th-year-in-eastern-market/

 

Fox 2 Detroit (2023)

https://www.fox2detroit.com/video/1252416

 

WXYZ Detroit (2023)

https://www.wxyz.com/news/political/spotlight-on-the-news/spotlight-on-the-news-oakland-county-small-business-loans-detroit-bookfest

 

WDIV ClickonDetroit (2023)

https://www.clickondetroit.com/video/news/2023/07/17/6th-annual-detroit-festival-of-books-held-at-eastern-market/

 

Fine Books Magazine (2023)

https://www.finebooksmagazine.com/events/book-club-detroit-presents-6th-annual-detroit-festival-books-2023-07-16

 

 

 

Detroit News (2022)

https://www.detroitnews.com/story/entertainment/books/2022/07/14/family-friendly-day-events-eastern-market-detroit-bookfest/7702727001/

 

Detroit Free Press (2022)

https://www.freep.com/picture-gallery/news/local/michigan/detroit/2022/07/17/michigan-authors-showcase-books-detroit-festival-books/10082858002/

 

 

 

Detroit Bookfest 2023 Festival Guide

Detroit Bookfest 2023 Festival Guide

Detroit Bookfest 2019 (photo by Ryan M. Place)

 

The Detroit Festival of Books, aka: Detroit Bookfest, is a FREE annual in-person event at Eastern Market in Detroit, Michigan.

Eastern Market

Shed 5

2934 Russell Street

Detroit, MI 48207

 

Sunday, July 16, 2023

10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

 

Facebook event page

https://www.facebook.com/events/540874824674576/

 

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/DetroitBookfest

 

We are also hosting Virtual Detroit Bookfest on our website from July 15-17, 2022

https://detroitbookfest.com/vendor-application-2022/

 

Eastern Market Detroit map

 

The phrase “Eastern Market” refers to both the large district/neighborhood and also the series of Sheds owned by the city of Detroit and run by the Eastern Market Partnership non-profit organization.

Opened in 1891, Eastern Market is the largest historic public market in the United States.

Featuring 43 acres of space, Eastern Market is comprised of a series of indoor and outdoor sheds which function as thriving year-round consumer markets.

This year, Detroit Bookfest will be located inside Shed 5 where vendors will be selling all sorts of books (ie: used, rare, antiquarian, authors, children’s, new, unusual, ephemera, etc), comic books, vinyl LP records, creative arts, and more.

Detroit Festival of Books (photo by Debography)

 

DJ Seven Whales will be providing the vibes.

 

Debbie Maciolek will be documenting the experience with her keen and perceptive eye.

 

Two food trucks, Sonny’s Hamburgers and Treat Dreams will be on the south side of Shed 5 on Alfred Street (east of Russell Street)

 

 

Char’latte Coffee Company: Two Metro Detroit sisters are bringing their Mobile Coffee Cart to Detroit Bookfest

 

Brilliant Detroit will be in the DTE Plaza on the westside of Shed 5, along Russell Street

 

The Detroit Metro Convention & Visitors Bureau’s D-Rover van will be outside Shed 5.

 

Pong Detroit, the ping-pong social club, will be wheeling some ping-pong tables over to Bookfest!

 

Deon Forrest (aka: Greektown Hotbox) Detroit’s own world-famous street performer will be live on Russell Street (at Alfred Street) outside Detroit Bookfest.

 

Detroit’s own Arts & Scraps is bringing the ScrapMobile to Bookfest! Kids will be able to build their own books here!

 

Birdie’s Bookmobile will be in the DTE Plaza outside Shed 5.

The Detroit Writing Room will be in the DTE Plaza outside Shed 5.

 

826michigan will be in the DTE Plaza outside Shed 5.

 

Detroit artist Rachel Quinlan created an exclusive painting for Detroit Bookfest

 

And more!

Health and safety is our #1 concern.

Whatever safety protocols are in place on Bookfest Day, we will be following them 100%.

We ultimately have no idea what to expect this year but we will do our absolute best to make it fun and safe.

JR Jones and Lonni Thomas, two of Eastern Market’s finest and also members of the Detroit Bookfest Committee (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

 

Our festival footprint has grown to include:

 

The Official Bookfest Afterparty down the street at Eastern Market Brewing Company (runs 10am-8pm)

https://detroitbookfest.com/bookfest-afterparty-embc/

 

Please explore the Detroit Bookfest Festival Guide below.

We also encourage you to make a day of it and explore the entire Eastern Market district, which is packed with hundreds of fun shops, restaurants, and experiences.

 

Eastern Market’s Shed 5 Detroit (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

 

 

Here’s our totally professional graphic designer-approved not flawed in any way screenshot MAP of the Bookfest Festival Footprint 

Detroit Bookfest festival map

 

Eastern Market Brewing Company

2515 Riopelle Street

 

Located three blocks southeast of Shed 5, Eastern Market Brewing Company (EMBC) is one of the most popular destinations in Eastern Market.

Currently, the street they’re on, Riopelle, is closed to vehicle traffic. It is pedestrian-only and they have tables in the street, food tent, live DJ Sam Morykwas, and of course beer, glorious beer.

Some of their most popular beers are:

Elephant Juice, Market Day IPA, Mae Blanc, Wonderboy, and White Coffee Stout

 

Bookfest Afterparty

https://detroitbookfest.com/bookfest-afterparty-embc/

 

Beer list

https://easternmarket.beer/beers/

 

Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/easternmarketbrewing/

 

Special thanks to Dayne Bartscht (owner) and his team

Eastern Market Brewing Company Detroit (photo courtesy of EMBC)

EMBC Detroit (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

EMBC Detroit (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

 

 

 

Pong Detroit

This afterhours ping-pong social club is located inside Bert’s Warehouse (2739 Russell Street)

Pong Detroit

 

The brainchild of former Honolulu-based radio DJ and pong enthusiast Mal Lang, their slogan is “unplug and play.”

Mal says, “Soccer is # 1 and table tennis is the # 2 participant sport in world. Table tennis is huge in China, India, Europe (especially Sweden & Germany).”

Bert’s Warehouse also features a comedy club, kitchen, and bar, so you can drink and pong all night long.

Lessons are available and they will be doing wheelchair table tennis soon.

Their other slogan is “Food, drinks, music and pong.”

Hours

Tuesday-Thursday

5:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.

Cost

$10/hr from 5-7pm, then $15/hr 7pm-11pm

 

Homepage

http://pongdetroit.com/

 

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/pongdetroit/

 

Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/pongdetroit/

 

Thanks to Mal Lang (owner)

 

Pong Detroit (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Pong Detroit

Pong Detroit inside Bert’s Warehouse (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Michigan shaped ping pong paddle (courtesy of Pong Detroit)

Bert’s Warehouse Detroit (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

 

 

 

The Dequindre Cut

Closest entrance located at 3017 Orleans Street.

 

The Cut,” as it’s called is a lovely greenway/urban recreational pathway for walking, biking, jogging.

It is 2-miles long and runs from the Detroit Riverfront to the northern tip of Eastern Market.

Near the Wilkins/Orleans entrance, you can find the Freight Yard Bar, this is an outdoor bar made out of shipping containers.

To get to the bar:

Enter at Orleans St & Wilkins St, walk down to the Cut, make a right, then it’s down on your left.

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/DequindreCutFreightYard

Dequindre Cut (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Dequindre Cut (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Dequindre Cut Map

Dequindre Cut (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Dequindre Cut (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Dequindre Cut Freight Yard bar (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Dequindre Cut (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Members of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra concert @ Dequindre Cut Freightyard Bar (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

 

 

 

Detroit City Distillery

2462 Riopelle Street

 

The Riopelle taproom of DCD is down the street from Eastern Market Brewing Company.

Here you will find a lively outdoor vibe, including music, cocktails and food from Midnight Temple, the Indian gastropub located above DCD. (hint: try the tandoori wings and gobi rollup).

 

Homepage

https://www.detroitcitydistillery.com/

 

Midnight Temple

https://www.midnighttemple.com/

 

Special thanks to JP Jerome (co-founder), Mike Forsyth (co-founder), Akash Sudhakara (Midnight Temple)

Detroit City Distillery (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Midnight Temple Indian food Detroit (photo courtesy of Yelp)

 

Detroit Hustles Harder shop

1353 Division Street

 

Detroit Hustles Harder is a globally recognized clothing store.

https://divisionstreetboutique.com/

 

Special thanks to Brendan Blumentritt (Detroit Hustles Harder)

 

 

The Eastern (event venue)

3434 Russell Street

The Eastern is a lovely 5,000-square foot industrial space you can rent out for special events.

Built in 1888, this is the old Hook and Ladder # 5 fire station. The Eastern has capacity for 300 seated or 600+ strolling and a 3,000 square foot outdoor patio.

Note: The entrance is not directly on Russell St, rather the main entrance is located on the north side of the building next to Wasserman Art Gallery.

Homepage

http://www.theeasterndetroit.com/

Virtual Tour

http://www.theeasterndetroit.com/virtual-tour

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/theeastern

Special thank you to Scott Rutterbush (owner).

The Eastern event space Detroit (courtesy The Eastern)

The Eastern event space Detroit (courtesy The Eastern)

The Eastern event space Detroit (courtesy The Eastern)

The Eastern event space Detroit (courtesy The Eastern)

 

 

Elsewhere in the Eastern Market district….

 

Eastern Market sculpture at Orleans and Erskine (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Eastern Market graffiti on Orleans Street, north of Erskine (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Eastern Market graffiti on Orleans Street, north of Erskine (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Eastern Market graffiti on Orleans Street, north of Winder (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Eastern Market graffiti on Orleans Street, north of Winder (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Eastern Market graffiti on Orleans Street, north of Winder (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Eastern Market graffiti on Orleans Street, north of Alfred (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

 

 

J’adore Loft 

2501 Russell Street, ste. 400

This fun event space is 2,000 square feet and has capacity for 50 seated or 125 strolling.

Great for meetings, weddings, photo shoots, events of all sorts.

Homepage

https://www.jadore-detroit.com/the-loft-1

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/jadoredetroit

Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/jadoredetroit/

Special thanks to Candice Simons (owner).

J’adore Loft in Eastern Market (photo courtesy of J’adore Loft Detroit)

J’adore Loft in Eastern Market (photo courtesy of J’adore Loft Detroit)

J’adore Loft in Eastern Market (photo courtesy of J’adore Loft Detroit)

J’adore Loft in Eastern Market (photo courtesy of J’adore Loft Detroit)

 

 

Dyno Indoor Climbing Gym

3500 Orleans Street

 

This place is really cool! Inside you will find 12-15 foot tall boulders and a 49 foot tall rope section.

You can get a day pass, punch pass, or membership.

Climbers must be over 4 years old and you have to be over 16 years old to belay.

 

Homepage

https://www.dynodetroit.com/

 

Special thanks to Dino Ruggeri (owner)

Dyno indoor climbing gym (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

Dyno indoor climbing gym (photo courtesy of Dyno)

 

 

Dorais Park Velodrome

601 Mack Avenue

Located on the NW edge of the Eastern Market district, this is also another really cool place!

Inside the 64,000 square foot dome you will find an indoor wooden bicycle track.

Bicyclists beware, you can actually go up to 50mph on your bicycle inside here!

 

Homepage

https://lexusvelodrome.com/

 

Special thanks to Dale Hughes (owner)

Dorais Park Velodrome (photo courtesy of the Velodrome)

Dorais Park Velodrome (photo by: Ryan M. Place)

 

That’s not everything in Eastern Market.

Merely a small sampling of some of the fun and exciting things you can do.

Be sure to explore the entire district and enjoy your experience in Detroit!

Exclusive Interview:  Deon Forrest (aka: Greektown Hotbox) Detroit’s own world-famous street performer will be live outside Detroit Bookfest

Exclusive Interview: Deon Forrest (aka: Greektown Hotbox) Detroit’s own world-famous street performer will be live outside Detroit Bookfest

 

Deon will be located on Russell Street at Alfred Street from 11am-3pm during Bookfest. Please bring money to tip him. Paper money, small bills are appreciated.

 

Considered a Detroit street legend and one of the top street performers in the Midwest by many, the musically gifted Deon Forrest, has built a reputation for doing his own thing.

Self-taught and ambidextrous, Deon “plays the pots” on the streets of Detroit, most notably drawing massive crowds in the neighborhoods of Eastern Market, Greektown and Downtown.

Videos of Deon have gone viral numerous times. Some of the videos online have over 60 million views. He was featured on the Jimmy Kimmel Show and some fans of his work include Eminem, Janet Jackson, Post Malone, Jermaine Dupri, and many others.

Deon’s sense of rhythm, timing, theatrics, audience engagement and overall musicianship are what sets him apart from the competition.

Big Sean’s Detroit 2 album cover (featuring Deon Forrest on the front cover)

 

Let’s hear from Deon directly:

 

I love Detroit. Straight up. I grew up on the streets, didn’t have nothing. Then In 2008, I got shipped here and lived in a group home in Southwest Detroit at Fort and Schaefer. I got myself together in Detroit. I found out who I was in Detroit, this city made me who I am.”

“At that time, nobody knew who I was. I didn’t even know who I was. I didn’t know what I wanted to be or what I really wanted to do. But I knew I needed a hustle. Couldn’t let my kids stay on the streets and I didn’t want to beg for money, so one day I’m at my friends and being a percussionist, I’m always tapping on stuff, and I’m getting into the rhythm and right then and there I realized Deon you’re going to be a street performer.”

“I started off as a techno drummer without the speaker. Now I got a TopTech Audio speaker specially rigged on wheels. Built my pots because I wanted to do something unique and different. And now I got a whole mobile orchestra! My kit includes: piano, pots, slider, etc. I use ten pots and one cymbal. The buckets provide the bass. My favorite drumsticks are the plastic-tipped marching band Vix Stix (aka: Vic Firth).”

“My style is like Daft Punk mixed with Stomp (the British percussion group) and I can remix any song.”

Deon Forrest (aka: Greektown Hotbox) Detroit’s own world-famous street performer (photo Deon Forrest)

“The streets is like a big petri dish for testing your skills. To be a street performer, you have to battle underground to see who’s the best. I earned the title ‘King of Greektown’ because I’m 10-0. You set up near a big crowd and try to take the crowd. Whoever draws and keeps the crowd is the winner and you earn that spot.”

“I beat the five Chicago bucket drummers. We were rivals for a minute but now we’re cool. I outmaneuvered the marching band and they even had big bass drums. Also whooped a few horn players. I’ll go toe to toe with anybody on the streets. You play something? Bring it. Let’s see what you got. I’m in Eastern Market, Greektown, all over Downtown, come find me.”

“I play outside a lot of sports games, especially the Detroit Tigers and Detroit Red Wings, and outside live music venues, especially the Fox Theatre and Masonic Temple. The most money I ever made in a short time was I made $1,200 playing drums for about 1h30min. On a typical night, I average around $500.”

“I did a performance for Post Malone in Greektown. I played Martha Reeves birthday party. I’ve been in an NFL commercial with Barry Sanders. I’ve done all sorts of stuff.”

Deon Forrest (aka: Greektown Hotbox) Detroit’s own world-famous street performer and Detroit rapper Big Sean (photo Deon Forrest)

“One of my main inspirations is Michael Jackson. I also find some parallels between his life and my life. For instance, there was the Jackson Five. I used to perform on the streets with five people, including my man Miles Hubbell, but gradually the group started shortening until it was just me. Plus, how he did the moonwalk, I built a slider on my kit so I can kick the pot out and moonwalk it back.”

“Believe it or not, I only practice in my head. I get the music on my phone and listen to it. I have a special ability to instantly memorize music. I have a song of list of hundreds of songs in my head. I also do requests. My favorite stuff to play is pop, dance, techno, R & B, etc.”

“I love Detroit because there’s all kinds of wonderful and different people here. The best advice I can give y’all is just be who you are. Because whether you like it or not, the Real You’s gonna come out eventually. Just let it shine.”

“I’m a big basketball fan, would love to do something with the Detroit Pistons.”

“Currently, I’m building a special set. It’s a 360-degree chair that spins. I sit in the middle and there’s four different drumming stations where I can spin and play multiple, different songs interchangeably.”

Come check out Deon on the pots!

Deon Forrest (aka: Greektown Hotbox) Detroit’s own world-famous street performer (photo Deon Forrest)

Contact (hire Deon for gigs)

[email protected]

 

Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/greektownhotbox/

 

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100017094069837

 

CashApp

$Greektownhotbox

 

Youtube

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh-cH6eDaRrko8HKeeYp9bw/videos?view=0&sort=p&flow=grid

Deon Forrest (aka: Greektown Hotbox) Detroit’s own world-famous street performer (photo Deon Forrest)

Deon Forrest (aka: Greektown Hotbox) Detroit’s own world-famous street performer (photo Deon Forrest)

 

 

Deon Forrest playing in Detroit for rapper Post Malone

 

 

 

Deon Forrest is featured in this commercial with Barry Sanders

 

Debbie Maciolek is the Official Photographer for Detroit Festival of Books

Debbie Maciolek is the Official Photographer for Detroit Festival of Books

Iconic photo of Detroit Bookfest taken by Debbie Maciolek in 2018 (Eastern Market, Shed 5, Detroit)

Native Detroiter, Debbie Maciolek, runs Debography, a local photography company. She expertly photographed some early incarnations of Bookfest for us in the past. And now, thankfully, she’s back!

The quality of her work is superb, and we are immensely fortunate to have her documenting the event.

You will see her running around at Detroit Bookfest taking photos. Please treat her with courtesy and respect.

Debbie Maciolek self-portrait (photo by Debbie Maciolek)

Here’s Debbie:

 

“I’ve got lots of books to donate. I can’t throw out a book. It goes against everything I believe in.”

“My early years? Wow, well, I grew up on Detroit’s Upper Eastside.  I lived on Lansdowne, between Yorkshire and Grayton and attended Guardian Angels at Kelly and Whittier and also Bishop Gallagher.”

“I attended Wayne State University, studying business and have my certificate of Photographic Arts from Macomb Community College.”

“For the past 28 years, my husband Bob and I have lived in Macomb. He’s a Colonel in the National Guard and we’ve owned a software business for 16 years now called Static Line Software.”

Abandoned Detroit building (photo by Debbie Maciolek)

“We have a son and a daughter, Blake and Claire, both finishing up college at Western Michigan and University of Michigan respectively and two furry kids. Our two dogs are Bella – a Lab-Pit mix, and Dexter – a Great Pyrenees-Siberian Husky mix.”

“I come from three generations of Detroit firefighters. My grandfather and father both retired as Chief of the city and my brother is a current Sergeant on the Eastside.”

“When I was young, my dad used to race stock outboard boats all over the state in short courses and marathons.  This is actually how I started photography. To this day, I love photographing live sports, especially hockey, and capturing the raw in-the-moment action.  Traveling frequently allowed us to camp all over the state. There is nothing like Michigan in the summer, the forests and lakes are incredible.”

Debography was started November 2016. I was able to leave my job with a software services company and move into being a photographer full-time. I shoot senior photos, lifestyle, off the beaten path type stuff, abandoned buildings, nature photography, events, etc.  Not weddings, never weddings.”

Detroit River photo (photo by Debbie Maciolek)

“My camera setup consists of a Canon 5D Mark IV and I use primarily Canon lenses, and Sigma Art lenses. My preferred editing software is Photoshop and I’ve found the absolutely best company for lighting supplies and support – Flashgear.net.”

“My advice for aspiring photographers is to understand the manual settings and remember that lighting is everything, it will always make or break your shots. Take the time to understand how light affects your subject.”

“As for hobbies, I love traveling, seeking out new adventures, experiencing off the beaten path type stuff. I’m an avid reader, mostly mysteries. I belong to a book club that’s…really more of a wine club, but hey, it’s fun. I’ve also been getting back into running, I’ve completed four half marathons and am looking to fit in a fifth one.”

Michigan is a wonderful state, we love it here; there is always something new to do. My husband and I have a cottage in Gladwin on Secord Lake and have made some fabulous friends up there. I grew up going to Burt Lake and Indian River, which are about a half hour south of Mackinaw City, and will always be one of my favorite spots. The State Park is great and the swimming and hiking can’t be beat.  Locally, we love spending time outdoors at Stony Creek Metropark and Dodge Park.  Favorite restaurants near our house include Da Francesco’s Ristorante for Italian food and Golden Fleece in Greektown for Greek food.”

“Outside of Michigan, my favorite spot hands down is Ireland. Stunningly beautiful country. I recommend renting a car and driving around southern Ireland, especially the Killarney area. And yes, for some reason, the Guinness really does taste better over there, the rumors are true! It tastes like Irish Magic.”

Castle in Ireland (photo by Debbie Maciolek)

 

 

 

Contact (hire Debbie for gigs here)

[email protected]

 

Homepage

https://debographyphoto.com/

 

Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/DebographyPics/

 

Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/debographyphotography/

 

Photo Art IG

https://www.instagram.com/debographyphotoart/

Owl in the trees (photo by Debbie Maciolek)

Nature photo (photo by Debbie Maciolek)

Fire hydrant encased by tree (photo by Debbie Maciolek)

Photo of a Horse (photo by Debbie Maciolek)

Capturing the Sunset (photo by Debbie Maciolek)

 

Exclusive Interview: Detroit bass legend Tony Green reveals his experiences with The Dramatics, Pfunk’s George Clinton, Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Death Row Records and more!

Exclusive Interview: Detroit bass legend Tony Green reveals his experiences with The Dramatics, Pfunk’s George Clinton, Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Death Row Records and more!

Snoop Dogg and Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

*special thank you to Dominic Riggio (Mess Bucket Comics) for introducing me to Tony Green*

Detroit, Michigan! A surfeit of wonderful characters and talented musicians regularly emanate from this city like mystical vapors, spreading transformable currents of raw talent, tendrils of undulating electricity, that levitate the membrane with a new form of sentience.

Case in point: Detroit bass legend Edward Anthony Green.

Also known as Tony Green, T-Money Green, TMoneyG, T-Green, T. Green, etc. Born and raised and holding it down for the city, Tony has been playing the bass with his distinct tone and timbre for over five decades. His style is immediately recognizable and has been influential on a global scale.

Detroit’s Tony Green of The Dramatics (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

An oft unacknowledged musical prodigy, Tony toured with soul R&B group The Dramatics for two decades, then worked with Pfunk’s George Clinton, then shot out to the West Coast to help create the G-Funk sound by working with Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, and Death Row Records in the early to mid 90’s.

Tony is a producer and ASCAP award-winning composer. In addition to playing with countless fellow high-level musicians over the years, he has created community by introducing many musicians to each other. The scope and depth of his true-life story has been largely unacknowledged until recently when Detroit author Jackie Wallace wrote a book about his life called Behind The Wall.

At this exact moment, I’m sitting inside Tony’s living room at 7 Mile and Livernois on Detroit’s Upper Westside. Present are Dr. Gail Soo Hoo (the Flute Doctor), Tony’s brother Will, and Zeus, the popcorn-eating Presa Canario puppy.

Tony has a gold record on the wall, an upside-down bass in his hand, and that exciting glint one gets when pulling out the treasure map to a constellation of thoroughly fascinating life stories.

Alright, all you boppers out there in the big city with an ear for the action. Sit back, relax, and listen to these tales true and gems uncut from Detroit’s own Tony Green.

 

Tony Green gold record for The Dramatics ‘Do What You Want to Do’ (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

 

Dialogue from Tony:

 

Tony Green: The Early Years

 

Detroit bass legend Tony Green thinking hmmm…… I will become a bass prodigy! (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“First off, everyone check out the new book Behind the Wall. It’s about my life and was written by my friend Jackie Wallace in Detroit. She’s the mom of JonPaul Wallace (Detroit singer) and Rocky Wallace (Detroit model & singer).”

“Jackie is a great friend, and we covered a lot in the book but there are still so many aspects to my hustle.”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green’s book Behind the Wall by Jackie Wallace (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“You know how many great musicians and performers have been in this house (Monica Street, Detroit), man? Ron Banks, the lead singer of The Dramatics, sat right there about 50 years ago, and asked my mama if I could go on the road with them. And before that we had tons of great jazz players over here. A lot of me has never been publicly explained but that’s about to change right now. Let’s get into it.”

“I was born September 22nd, 1956, at Selfridge Air National Guard Base in Harrison Township, Michigan. My grandparents were from Calhoun, Mississippi. My biological parents were Rene Shaw and Roy Edward Green. My dad Roy was in the US Air Force in Vietnam (1965-75) and received two Bronze Stars for bravery.”

“Growing up, all my toys were tents, canteens, all army-type stuff. He lived in Roseville but also stayed in Los Angeles and San Antonio when he was home on leave, so when I spent time with him in the summers, we were in all those cities. He unfortunately died at the young age of 42 from the lingering effects of Agent Orange. His wife, my stepmom Ruth, used to torture me emotionally & physically.”

“My biological mom Rene was a pro bowler. She had over 100 trophies. She bowled at the Bowl-O-Drome (Dexter ave, Detroit), W-Y 7 bowling alley (Wyoming ave, Detroit), Thunderbowl (Allen Park; world’s largest bowling alley), Garden Bowl (Woodward ave, Detroit; world’s oldest bowling alley), all over the place, even out of state. I remember as a kid we sometimes used to take the little guy off the top of the trophies and put him on a necklace chain. I love bowling, my mom and I used to play on leagues together.”

Detroit jazz bassist William Austin

“I lived with my mom Rene and my stepdad William Austin. We originally lived at Elmhurst St and Dexter Ave in Detroit. Then in 1964, we moved here to 7 Mile and Livernois, which was a predominantly Jewish neighborhood at the time. Growing up, all my friends were Jewish. I went to Pasteur Elementary (19811 Stoepel St), Hampton Junior High (3900 Pickford st) and Mumford High School (17525 Wyoming ave).”

“But it was here in this house, man, that my love for music happened. I grew up hearing so much great jazz music live at the house and down the street at Baker’s Keyboard Lounge (Detroit; world’s oldest jazz club) that I almost feel guilty that other people didn’t get to experience that growing up.”

Detroit jazz bassist William Austin playing with Lionel Hampton (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

 

“It was an amazing group of jazz musicians here at our house. Sonny Stitt, Lionel Hampton, Esther Philips, Gloria Lynn, Jack McDuff, Earl Klugh, Yusef Lateef, Spanky Wilson, the female pianist Terry Pollard, Marcus Belgrave, Wendell Harrison, etc, all used to play downstairs jam sessions here in the basement. It was typically before a set they would be playing at Baker’s or they’d be in town for the weekend and drop by. We used to have BBQ cookouts eating my stepdad’s BBQ and my mom’s famous mac and cheese. Had the hi-fi going in the living room. Used to have a piano in the basement (my 5yr old brother Ricky would play; also my other brother Will Austin III plays guitar). Nobody was drinking alcohol, just playing jazz music. Man, those were the days.”

“My stepdad Will was a phenomenal jazz bassist. William Austin was originally from St. Louis and was self-taught on the bass. He toured with Barry Harris, Sonny Stitt, played a residency with Yusef Lateef at Klein’s Showbar (8540 12th st, Detroit). Eventually, most of the Detroit guys left for New York to work, so my stepdad, who was in the military, played bass in the US Air Force Band.”

William Austin (February 22, 1932 – April 28, 2020). RIP. Until we meet again.”

 

 

“Other than the music, the family, and the great food, we didn’t have shit growing up. My Grandma would put a quilt around a rock and we’d play catch with it. That’s the kind of toys we had. Poverty in one regard, but rich in another. Rich in spirit and laughter and the memories.”

“My mom and her six sisters raised us. A lot of my influences came from home, my aunts, and my first cousin Felix Washington who later played in the band Bostonian with me. But lemme tell you. Growing up in Detroit in the 1960’s and 70’s was the bomb! I love music. We grew up listening to the Rolling Stones, The Beatles, Motown. It was a great city to grow up in, safe to walk around, no cellphones.”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Marvin Gaye lived on our corner (3067 W. Outer Drive, Detroit) and he used to throw the football to us. Real cool dude. Originally, Berry Gordy the guy who ran Motown Records, had bought the house for his sister Anna Gordy who was married to Marvin. They did the photos for the What’s Going On Album (1971) in the backyard. One of Marvin’s good friends, Lem Barney, the Detroit Lions football player, used to be over there at his house all the time hanging out.”

“Marvin lived next door to The Temptations road manager (19371 Monica St, Detroit) he’d let us sneak downstairs to look at the famous 5-mike microphone stand and the Temptations uniforms.”

Marvin Gaye in Detroit (photo courtesy of Azalia Hackley)

 

Tony Green becomes a Bass Prodigy

Detroit bass legend Tony Green with The Dramatics (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“It all started when I went to a talent show at Mumford High School in 1969-70. The very talented Reggie McBride played there, he went on to play with Elton John and a bunch of people. Gene Dunlap was on drums. Amazing the amount of talent from Detroit. The Clark Sisters. James Jamerson Jr was at Mumford but barely showed up. Anyway, when I saw Reggie kick out the jams on the bass, I knew I wanted to be a bass player.”

“My first bass was a Fender, like Jimi Hendrix. I got another Teisco bass from Federals department store (8 Mile and Dequindre, Detroit) when I was 14 years old. I play the bass upside down. My E string is at the bottom. And those old Fender basses are heavy. Later, my bass was a Spector and much lighter.”

“I don’t have any particular brand affinity. I’ll play any bass. I’ve always taken whatever bass I have to Tim Flaharty who used to run Music Castle (Woodward and 13 Mile, Royal Oak), now I take it to his house.”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green’s early band Roadwork (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“In 1971, I started playing in bands at 15 years old. My first band was Funk Enterprise, which was a mix of black and white guys, we would play hall parties.”

“Then I played in Eternity. My friend Greg Phillinganes played the keyboards and the moog in Eternity. He later worked with Stevie Wonder, Lionel Ritche, Eric Clapton, Phil Collins, he was Michael Jackson’s musical director. Eternity also featured Kerry Campbell (sax), Sidney Chaney (drums), Greg King (trumpet) and Larry King (sax).”

“I kept getting kicked out of bands because I didn’t have equipment. My uncle eventually co-signed for me to get an amp for my bass.”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green circa 1969-70 (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“Then I started a band called Roadwork, which exists to this day. Our original lineup was Corey Heath (Drums), Dwayne Nunn (organ), Roc Williams (guitar), Robin Harriston and Brenda Joy (singers), Farley on trumpet, Lenny on sax, and yours truly on bass. The promoter Greg Willingham helped us book shows. He ran a company called Showbiz Kids, they booked teen gigs.”

“Back then, my bands played at The Sentinel (2211 E. Jefferson, Detroit), the Latin Quarter, upstairs at Chin Tiki’s (2121 Cass ave, Detroit), Ethel’s Lounge (7341 Mack ave, Detroit), various VFW halls and high schools, etc.”

 

17-year-old Tony Green joins The Dramatics

Detroit bass legend Tony Green with The Dramatics (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“In 1974, my band Roadwork was playing Club Ocies (Fenkell and Cherrylawn, Detroit) when I got discovered by The Dramatics lead singers LJ Reynolds and Ron Banks. The club was a gangster-style club owned by a guy named Flukey Stokes, who also owned a poolhall down the street. I used to sell Ron weed and eventually he found out my bass abilities and they hired me on the spot.”

“When I first met him, Ron Banks lived at Plainview and McNichols. Later he moved to a house by the Detroit Zoo. He went to Northern High School and originally wanted to be a baseball player.”

I toured with The Dramatics from 1975-1992. From the ballads through the disco era. It was one helluva ride!”

“When I first joined, we used to play the 20 Grand Club (5020 14th st, Detroit) a lot. My first out of state show was the Circle Star Theatre in San Carlos, California, near San Francisco.”

“We had a 50-seat Trailways bus and would play for thousands of people nightly. Man, it was wild.”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green with The Dramatics (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“In 1978, I helped The Dramatics write their only gold record, Do What You Want To Do. I wrote four songs on there.”

“Then Ron Banks and George Clinton (Parliament Funkadelic) and I co-wrote ‘One of Those Funk Thangs’, which was featured on Parliament’s Motor Booty Affair album. It went on to become one of the most sampled songs in hip-hop history.”

“A guy named Armen Boladian (Bridgeport Music) the so-called “sample troll” supposedly owns most of the copyrights to George Clinton’s songs, including that one.”

“The story is that George later signed the rights away to most of his catalog in 1983 to Bridgeport but who knows what happened.”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green with The Dramatics gold record (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“From 1980-81, I was also doing stuff with a soul R&B group called Five Special. Me, Ron Banks, Darnell Kimbrough and Baby Ray Johnson put the whole process together.”

“The band was Bryan Banks (Ron’s brother), Steve Boyd, Greg Finley, Steve Harris, and Mike Petillo. These guys could sing. Me, Ron and Baby Ray Johnson (who went to Mumford with me) wrote Why Leave Us Alone. Together we three had a great chemistry for writing. I played bass, Ron sang, and Ray played the piano.”

“In 1980, I had formed a group that featured me, my first cousin Felix Washington (piano), and our friend Doug Poisson (drums and financier). We recorded a song called Keep the Groove. I named our group Bostonian. The band name came after the track was laid down.”

“We recorded that bad boy at United Sound Studios (5840 2nd Ave, Detroit), then made 600 records of it at Archer Recording Pressing Plant (7401 E. Davison, Detroit). A few decades later, that track became a major collector’s item and the centerpiece of Clap City Records (Clapton, East London, England).”

“1983, I recorded a track called When the Cat’s Away with a group called Five O’Clock. My cousin Felix had a groove, I wrote the words.”

“We went to a club called the Blue Chip Lounge (13301 W. McNichols, Detroit) and a group was singing there. They were good but had never recorded anything. So we did and A & B side single and before that we did Watch for the Morning.”

“In the 1980’s, I married Simone English (Bowden), a Detroit photographer. We moved out to Hollywood Hills, California. She was originally Ron Banks’ girl, but she liked me more.”

“In 1985, I started Hyped International Records, a label which continues to this day.”

“That same year, 1985, Ron Banks and I were freebasing (smoking cocaine) at my apartment Vista del Mar (2071 Vista Del Mar st, Unit # 6, Los Angeles, CA). Suddenly, he started acting real weird. I opened a bottle of water for him and he looked at it and muttered ‘I can’t let you kill me like that’. I said ‘What are you talking bout Ron? You just saw me open a brand new bottle’. He got all weirded out and just walked out of the apartment. Bout 15 minutes later he comes back all bloodied. The front of him was shredded, there was blood everywhere, all over my gray carpet, it looked like a murder scene.”

“Apparently, he had scaled a barbed wire fence. He had to get 182 stitches. He almost died in my kitchen. I remember the ambulance tech said five minutes more, he would of bled out because he had severed a major artery.”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green and Dramatics lead singer Ron Banks freebasing cocaine in Los Angeles (photo courtesy of Google Archives)

“Not long after that, I had a heart attack. I was 29 years old. My enzyme levels were through the roof, they said I needed a triple bypass. While I was in the hospital, Ben Crosby, our manager and the owner of Ben’s Hi Chapparal Club (6683 Gratiot, Detroit), flew out to LA and unexpectedly visited me. He was like an angel at the hospital. You never know who your angels are gonna be.”

“While at the hospital, I wrote a song called I Love The Lord. I taught it to The Dramatics band, and we played it the week after in Toronto and got a standing ovation for it. I eventually recorded it with Huriah Boynton. Later, LJ Reynolds covered it on his gospel album.”

“So, yeah, eventually, I had to quit The Dramatics, man. All the cocaine flowing around everywhere all the time just got to be too crazy. Sugar Bear (Willie Ford) and everyone just getting too tore up and not playing enough music. So, in 1988 I moved back to Detroit for a couple years.”

 

 

Tony Green links up with Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, and Death Row Records

Dr. Dre and Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“In 1993, I was managing David Ruffin Jr. (D-Ruff). David is the son of The Temptations singer David Ruffin, who had recently passed away inside a West Philly crackhouse. I wanted to help out my man, so I hooked him up with opening for The Dramatics.”

“So, we’re out in California doing a show and a female fan sees us perform and invites us to come back out to LA soon. She lived in Los Angeles and claimed to know where all the new rappers hung out, some guys named Dr. Dre. Snoop Dogg and Warren G. She said we should drive out and she’d take us there.”

“So, in February 1993, D-Ruff (David Ruffin Jr.) and I drove out there. Our bright green beater ’72 Impala broke down in Arizona. On the way driving out to California, we listened to a cassette tape of Dr. Dre’s The Chronic for about 17 hours straight, kept flipping sides in the tape deck over and over.”

Dr. Dre’s tape The Chronic

“True to her word, the female fan took us to Glam Slam West (333 S. Boylston St, Los Angeles), a nightclub owned by Prince. While we’re in there, sure enough, D-Ruff notices all the rappers.”

“David goes over and introduces himself, then me, and we meet Snoop Dogg, Warren G, and The D.O. C. All the guys were real cool and they told me that Dr. Dre was looking for a bassist.”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green with Snoop Dogg and Death Row Records (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“About a week later, Dr. Dre and I connected and met in the studio. Fortunately, when we met Dre, we took our lady’s brand new ’93 Benz to the meeting. Turned out that Dre had the exact same one but a convertible. Had we taken our beater, we wouldn’t have gotten the gig.”

“We met at The Village recording studio (1616 Butler ave, Los Angeles, CA) where Dre had recorded The Chronic in April 1992.”

“He wanted to know how I good I was, so I played about 20 different bass lines in two minutes to his song ‘Nuthin’ but a G Thang’ and he just went wild and offered to hire me at $700/wk to play bass and D-ruff at $250/wk to sing. Every Friday I would get a check from him.”

“Dre would be drumming, he’d give me his drumbeats and I had to layer them with my bass lines. We did this at The Village recording studio.”

Snoop Dogg and Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“I became the band director and bass player for Death Row Records. I did the bass on Snoop Dogg’s Doggystyle album and tons of songs.”

“I created the ‘Gin and Juice’ bassline for Snoop right on the spot.”

“The Doggystyle album was recorded at multiple studios: Larrabee West (8811 Santa Monica Blvd, West Hollywood), Larrabee North (4162 Lankershim blvd, North Hollywood), The Enterprise studio (4620 W. Magnolia, Burbank), and the Village and possibly others.”

“To finish the album, we all stayed in the Larrabee North studio the last 48 hours straight for a marathon session. We ate good, laughed a lot and pushed through. When that album came out, it was the first debut release to enter the Billboard charts at # 1. The album release party was in November ’93 on a 165-foot yacht in Marina del Ray. I decided not to go, which turned out to be a good idea, because it got chaotic.”

“I also played bass on some tracks for DJ Quik. We recorded those at Skip Saylor’s Studio in Los Angeles.”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green and Dr. Dre (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“At one point, Dre had on ankle tether and couldn’t leave his house, so we partied over there a lot. His house was in a beautiful gated sub called Mountain View Estates in Calabasas, California.”

“We recorded there too, he had an SSL 24-track mixing board and full in-house studio. Wild parties nonstop, lots of weed smoking, I’d be cooking shrimp on the grill. Warren G and his uncle Wron G were also real cool and would be hanging around but Warren, although he was Dre’s stepbrother, was signed with Def Jam not Death Row.”

“I hooked Death Row up with a lot of talented people. My wife Simone became the official Death Row photographer.”

“Dre needed a guitarist, so I introduced him to Detroit guitarist, Ricky Rouse. Back in the 60’s, a young 7-year-old Ricky played guitar while 11-year-old Stevie Wonder played piano, the guy is an incredibly talented guitarist. He had also done some disco songs with Bohannon. Ricky went to Norhern High School in Detroit but dropped out in ’72 to tour with Undisputed Truth.”

“Eventually, Snoop found out I had been in The Dramatics and wanted to meet them, so I made it happen, which helped reignite the career of The Dramatics.”

“On the spot, I called LJ Reynolds for Snoop. LJ answers saying ‘Mr. Green, I heard you hit the big time’ and I handed Snoop the phone, Snoop says ‘Is this really LJ Reynolds? Can you sing Key to the World?’ so LJ busted it out and Snoop went wild.”

“This led to them collaborating on the song Doggy Dogg World on Snoop’s album Doggystyle. The music video for that was fun as hell, too. We had all the Blaxploitation stars there: Pam Grier, Rudy Ray Moore, Ron O’Neal, Fred Williamson, and Huggy Bear and Rerun (Fred Berry) from Soul Train.”

LG Reynolds, Huggy Bear, Pam Grier, and Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“And here’s a fun fact for you: Snoop Dogg’s dad, Vernell Varnado, was my mailman in Detroit! For years, he used to bring me my ASCAP royalty checks.”

“In 1985, Snoop lived here in Detroit with his dad (11398 Whitehill St, Detroit) and Snoop worked at the McDonald’s on Greenfield and 8 Mile.”

“Dr. Dre had never met George Clinton. So one day, George was in Studio B at The Village, and Dre wanted to meet him. I told him I knew George like a father and Dre seemed skeptical, so I walked down there and peeked in the room. As soon as he sees me, George says ‘I knew somebody had permission to be funkin’ like that!’. I tell him about Dre, George asked me “they got anything down there?” (drugs). I say no. George had mostly been living at his farm in the Irish Hills (Brooklyn, Michigan) smoking crack in a house owned by Armen the sample troll. So, I walked George down the hallway and hooked up Mr. Parliament Funkadelic himself with Dr. Dre and the rest is history.”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green and Pfunk’s own George Clinton (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“In 1994, I produced two songs on the Above the Rim soundtrack. It was the track CPO’s Just So Ya No. The co-producer on it was Carl “Butch” Small. The other one was Mi Monie Rite by Lord G. Butch’s son DJ Los did the beat for Lord G. Butch was another Detroit guy I brought to Death Row. Butch was a master percussionist with The Dramatics.”

“Overall, I mean Dr. Dre is a genius. You have got to give the dude credit for that. Because of him, I played bass on the Arsenio Hall Show, MTV, Saturday Night Live, the Magic Johnson Show, etc. Also, every single record that Dre has done has gone either gold or platinum. Eminem, who Dre sponsored and nurtured, has gone Diamond six times, making Eminem the number one most awarded musician for singles in RIAA history.”

My bass is on Gin and Juice, the Regulate G-Funk Mix, California Love, Murder Was the Case, the Dogg Pound, Lady of Rage’s Afro Puff, and a lot more man.”

“I also played the bass for Shaquille O’Neal’s single Biological Didn’t Bother (Remix) that was produced by Warren G.”

Shaquille O’Neal & Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“In 1995, I played the bass on Coolio’s song Rollin with the Homies. It was featured on the soundtrack to Clueless.”

“Coolio was a cool dude. RIP. Another one gone too soon.”

“We did Da Five Footaz-Walk Away. It was on the Jason’s Lyric soundtrack.”

“As for 2Pac, I never actually met 2Pac but my basslines are on California Love.”

“However, I did meet Biggie Smalls (the Notorious BIG) once. It was about 1995, I met Biggie at DTW (the Detroit Airport). He was a big and tall dude. Real cool guy, we talked about the music industry and Detroit. Biggie loved Detroit (‘my Detroit players’).”

The infamous Death Row chair from Suge Knight’s office at Can-Am

“At one point, I was in Kingston, Jamaica helping the billionaire Josef Bogdanovich produce reggae artists like Lady Saw. Joe is a reggae fanatic who runs a company called DownSound Entertainment. His grandparents were Croatian immigrants who founded StarKist Tuna.”

“Joe is also an executive producer who also helped save Reggae Sumfest, the largest reggae event in the Caribbean.”

 

“After Death Row, I went on tour with my man Warren G from 1996-98. Warren is another great guy. He and Snoop and Nate Dogg are from Long Beach. We used to record at Warren’s house sometimes in Lakewood, just outside Long Beach. He started his own label, G-Funk Records, that was distributed by Def Jam.”

“When I went on tour with him, we did the Spring Break parties in Lake Havasu, then went on an overseas tour. Germany, Switzerland, France, went to the top of the Eiffel Tower. My favorite was Japan. I had gone there twice with The Dramatics, then came back with Warren G. He was huge in London, and we did the MTV ‘Live in London’ show.”

“At the Billboard Music Awards, me, Warren G and Nate Dogg had “Big Mike” as a security guard. He later became an actor. His real name was Michael Clarke Duncan. He was in the Green Mile, Slammin Salmon, Armageddon, etc.”

“Big Mike had been working for Vassal Benford, a Detroit keyboard player who moved to LA in the late 80’s. Unfortunately, Big Mike is gone now. RIP.”

Michael Clarke Duncan, aka bodyguard Big Mike (photo courtesy of Google Archives)

“Warren’s manager was his uncle, Wrong G (Ron Griffin). Wron G was 6’4” tall former special ops US Marine Corps soldier and the real deal. He never took off his sunglasses and he wore a long coat like Shaft.”

“Couple years ago, in 2020, Snoop Dogg came to Detroit. Where T Green at? We went and hung out with him at the Fillmore (2115 Woodward Ave, Detroit) for a few hours after the show. We all smoked blunts and talked about the good old days. A video of him and I singing there went viral on Instagram.”

“Yep, our music has rattled a lot of trunks over the years, man. Rattled a lot of skulls and bank accounts, too.”

 

 

The Detroit Legacy

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“I came back to Detroit. Started laying down some tracks at a favorite studio of mine, Sound Suite Studios (14750 Puritan ave) which had been open since 1975. It closed around 2000. We had also recorded the Five Special album here. I did a lot of recording here over the years.”

“I signed a deal with Bellmark Records to produce my album Organized Kaos Hour 1. It’s a series that I’m still working on.”

“I played bass for two tracks on Robbie Robertson’s album Music for the Native Americans.”

“Around about 1995 or so, I let Sick Notes (Dewitt and Pep) record at Sound Suite. They ended up writing two songs for Eminem.”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“In 2001, we did an album with Westbound Records called Hyped Up Westbound Soljaz. It was for Pfunk and George Clinton. The Westbound label was started in 1968 by Armen Boladian. There was another album called The Streetz are Paved with Green that I cut for Westbound but it was never released.”

“Also in 2001-2002, I was in the Eminem movie 8 Mile but unfortunately my scene got cut.”

“I played bass for Detroit rapper Big Herk’s Rock Bottom crew.”

“The Detroit rapper Mersiless Amir is featured on my new album along with several other amazing artists.”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“Then in 2010, I met the yin to my yang. Dr. Gail Soo Hoo, aka: the Flute Doctor. She had been first chair at Northwestern High School, which is saying something because several phenomenal musicians came outta there, including Ray Parker Jr. (1971 grad; he did the Ghostbusters theme song).”

“2016, we did Slight Return (Mark Kassa’s band) with George Clinton.”

“I used to record at Studio A (5619 N. Beech Daly, Dearborn Heights) when my engineer Steve Capp was there. Now he’s over at 54 Sound recording studio (Ferndale) so I’m over there now. 54 Sound is owned by a great guy named Joel Martin. Eminem and The Bass Brothers also record there.”

Dr. Gail Soo Hoo aka: the Flute Doctor (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

 

Tony Green The Man

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

“Some bands and musicians I’m a fan of are Jimi Hendrix (purple haze, changes), Chick Corea, Elton John, Grand Funk Railroad, Graham Central Station, WDRQ radio, etc. I love Anita Baker’s album Rapture. I love Chris Squire’s bass talents on Roundabout by Yes.”

“Some of my personal favorite bass players are Larry Graham, Stanley Clarke, Victor Wooten, and the Detroit bassists James Jamerson (my all-time fav), “Fast Eddie” Watkins Jr (he got started on The Temptations 1973 album Masterpiece), Ralphe Armstrong, and Lamont Johnson.”

“I was recently featured in the book Titans of Bass. I had the podcast Bass in Your Face.”

Tony Green featured in Titans of Bass book

“My partner McKayla Prew (talented new singer) and I run Hyped Up Live Sessions, which is a monthly livestream music jam that we record live at my studio inside the Russell Industrial Center (1600 Clay St, Detroit).”

Detroit bass legend Tony Green and Snoop Dogg hanging out in Detroit (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

The Dramatics singer LJ Reynolds is still alive. We still talk and collaborate regularly. LJ rehearses every Wednesday in my studio at the Russell.”

“Right now, I have what I call The Vault, which is a collection of over 2,000 songs (including 200 reel-to-reel masters) that I’ve created in my lifetime. Some of these are on my new album Organized Kaos Hour 3, check it out.”

“I’m actively working on a follow-up book about my life, which is being written by Detroit author Jenn Goeddeke.”

“As for the bass? Why is the bass important? Well, many great groups are driven by the bass and drums. A good bass player will let the song breathe and flex. And you got to have stage presence, meaning make your lives performances interesting, don’t just sit there staring down at your shoes.”

“My advice to young aspiring musicians is to keep in mind that most of the music industry is about who you know. So get out there, network, make connections, and always try to help other people. But just remember to give proper credit where credit is due. And don’t listen to your friends, just keep playing the music you like and honing your talent every single day. And above all, never wish you were somebody else. Always stay true to you internally eternally.”

 

Contact Tony Green

Email:

[email protected]

Cellphone:

(313) 595-2625 (text first, please don’t call)

 

Tony Green Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/tmoneygreen

 

Tony Green Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/tonygreen731gmail.com_/

 

Tony Green Music Credits

https://www.discogs.com/artist/205403-Tony-Green-2?type=Credits&filter_anv=0

https://rateyourmusic.com/artist/tony_green_f1/credits/

 

Tony Green on Classmates

https://www.classmates.com/siteui/people/edward-green/8681175744

Detroit bass legend Tony Green and Snoop Dogg (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green’s album Organized Kaos 1 (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green and DJ Quik (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green album Five O’Clock-When the Cat’s Away 1983 (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

The Dramatics: LJ Reynolds, Detroit bass legend Tony Green, and Ron Banks (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

The Dramatics @ Circle Star Theatre in San Carlos

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit Red Wings player Darren McCarty & Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

T. Bostonian

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

George Clinton, Snoop Dogg, and Dr. Dre (photo courtesy of Google Archives)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Wu Tang Clan’s Ghostface Killah & Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green and Snoop Dogg go viral in Detroit (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Pfunk Motor Booty Affair

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green and Detroit model Rocky Wallace (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green and Shaquille O’Neal (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green and Snoop Dogg (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green and rapper Ice Cube (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

Detroit bass legend Tony Green (photo courtesy of Tony Green)

 

Detroit jazz bassist William Austin (photo courtesy of his stepson Tony Green)

Detroit jazz bassist William Austin (photo courtesy of his stepson Tony Green)

Detroit jazz bassist William Austin (photo courtesy of his stepson Tony Green)

Detroit jazz bassist William Austin (photo courtesy of his stepson Tony Green)

Detroit jazz bassist William Austin (photo courtesy of his stepson Tony Green)